Jeffrey R. Young

As OER Grows Up, Advocates Stress More Than Just Low Cost

Open educational resources hit a turning point in 2018. For the first time ever, the federal government put forward funds to support initiatives around open educational resources, and recent studies show that faculty attitudes towards using and adapting these openly-licensed learning materials are steadily improving.But, fans of OER are increasingly facing a problem. While OER started off as free online textbooks, it still costs money to produce these materials, and professors often need guidance finding which ones are high quality.

Article in Journal ‘Science’ Argues MOOC Participation is Declining as Providers Pivot

What lessons can be learned from the rise and pivot of MOOCs, those large-scale online courses that proponents said would disrupt higher education? An article this week in the prestigious journal ‘Science’ explores that question, digging into six years of data from MOOCs offered by Harvard University and MIT on the edX platform launched by the two universities.

Blogs sindicados: 

What’s an HBX Again? Nevermind. Harvard Business School Rebrands Its Online Offerings.

Harvard University’s famed business school has an announcement to make: Forget HBX. From now on the school will instead refer to its online offerings under a more straightforward banner, Harvard Business School Online.

Blogs sindicados: 

The Year in Podcasts: Top EdSurge On Air Episodes of 2018

This year a growing number of EdSurge readers put on their headphones to listen to our weekly podcast, EdSurge On Air. (Subscribe here.)

Etiquetas: 
Blogs sindicados: 

This Administrator Helped Shape Tech at Colleges For More Than 40 Years. Here’s His Outlook on What’s Next.

Portland, Oregon—To get to Marty Ringle’s office at Reed College, you have to climb to the top floor of the Educational Technology Center building and get buzzed past a locked door that says “This is a Secure Area.” It felt like I was making a pilgrimage to the digital equivalent of a wise old master on the top of some mountain.

Blogs sindicados: 

Blockchain Could Rewire Higher Ed. But Should It?

Bitcoin is volatile. Even so, a growing number of colleges are exploring how the technology behind cryptocurrencies could change the way students communicate their academic accomplishments to employers.That technology is called blockchain, and it's a way to maintain digital records that can't be tampered with. So what are colleges already doing to experiment with blockchain?

In China’s Silicon Valley, Edtech Starts at the ‘MOOC Times Building’

Beijing—The Chinese government is pushing online education these days, and like so many things in this country of 1.4 billion people, that means going big. One sign of that: There’s a 22-story tower in the country’s capital officially named the “MOOC Times Building” that houses a government-supported incubator for edtech companies.

Blogs sindicados: 

What College Professors Should Know About Learning Science

Researchers are gaining a better understanding of how people learn—both what works and what doesn’t go so well—in the classroom. The next step is to apply that research in actual college instruction.One person pushing to put learning science into practice on college campuses is Sanjay Sarma, vice president for open learning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In China, a Generation Raised by ‘Tiger Mothers’ Seeks a Softer Approach

For Nancy Xu, childhood revolved around her studies. That meant early-morning bus rides to school, loads of after-school classes, and by high school, spending 12 hours a day on coursework. Xu grew up in northwestern China, and the reason for all that studying was a high-stakes test called the Gaokao, a nationwide college-entrance exam. In many cases, this one ultracompetitive test determines what kind of job the student will be able to pursue as an adult.

Blogs sindicados: 

Here’s What Happened When One University Asked Everyone for Ideas to Reinvent Campus

poiHere’s an idea for revolutionizing a college campus: run a zipline from one prominent building to another. That would help keep pathways less crowded and could be opened to the public on weekends to generate new revenue.That was one of about 24,000 suggestions sent in last week during a two-day online discussion asking students, faculty, staff, alumni and anyone else to make suggestions for what Long Beach State University should look like in the year 2030.

Syndicate content