Sydney Johnson

Tech Employees Question Credentials, Prerequisites and Privilege With #UnqualifiedForTech

Jake Behrens is an evangelist and engineer at Apple. Jon Parrott is works is a developer programs engineer at Google. David Demaree is a product manager for Typekit Adobe.

As Bootcamps Look for Novel Ways for Students to Pay For Their Studies, Many Try ‘Deferred Tuition’

Coding bootcamp App Academy was an early adopter of the student-financing option known as an income share agreement, or ISA. But after nearly five years using the model—where a student doesn’t pay tuition up front, but owes their school or lender some percentage of their income for a set period of time after landing a job—the school had to alter its plan.

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MissionU Welcomes Its First Class and an $8.5M Series A Round

Just a week after welcoming its first cohort of 30 students to class, startup university MissionU is opening its doors to a few other guests: education-minded investors. The company announced it has raised $8.5 million in a Series A round led by FirstMark Capital. Existing investors First Round Capital, University Ventures, Box Group, Rethink Education and Learn Capital also participated, along with new investors John Doerr and Omidyar Network.

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When Employment is the Goal, Should 'Student Success' Include Dropouts?

If a student drops out of college to take a job they are training for, should that count as success or failure?

For many higher-ed officials, the answer has traditionally been no. Traditionally, an institution’s mission is to help students get a degree to show they have acquired knowledge and skills. Many colleges also have a financial incentive to keep completion rates high if they receive funding from the state based on enrollment and graduation performance.

?Are We Recreating Segregated Education Online?

Online courses helped kick off a movement promising that your zipcode no longer had to determine the quality of education you received. People in rural Bhutan could take a computer science class from Harvard. Students at a community college could supplement their math class with lectures from MIT. A single mom in middle America could learn to code from Google instructor.

?Do the Technophobes and Technophiles Both Need a ‘New Education’?

Sometimes it's hard to imagine change—especially when it comes to a 150-year-old system, such as higher education in the United States. But much of the system we see and experience today was designed, and perhaps it can be again. At least, that's what professor Cathy Davidson writes in her latest book, “The New Education.”

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So, What IS the Future of Work?

For many attending the Future of Work symposium on Wednesday, there wasn’t any question whether automation is going to take over jobs—but rather when, and how education should respond.

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?Kahoot Pulls Back the Curtains for Studio, a Library of Ready-Made Learning Games

A hallmark of Kahoot’s learning games platform has been the ability for teachers to create quizzes and games for students to use during class. But “the biggest challenge we see with teachers is time,” Erik Harrell, its CEO, tells EdSurge. For even the biggest Kahoot fans, the time needed to put together unique quizzes can be restrictive. So the company set out to make Kahoot Studio, a curated library of ready-to-play kahoot games for K-12 educators and their students.

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?A Fight for Internet Access Is Brewing in Alaska

If you think your monthly internet bill is high, try $233,817. That’s how much Nome Public Schools in Alaska is charged for its 700 students, according E-rate data gathered by nonprofit EducationSuperHighway.

A steep price like that is not unheard of for rural districts in Alaska—and some people worry it might only get worse.

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?This College Program Wants to Overhaul the Education Culture in Alaska

Nearly 40 percent of students starting at 4-year public institutions took at least one developmental (or college-level readiness) course while enrolled from 2003 to 2009. For the University of Alaska, that number is even higher: an internal study shows 60 percent of students required developmental coursework over the last 10 years.

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