21st Century Skills

Five Tips for Teaching Typing and Why It's Essential

Keyboarding is, perhaps, the most essential of all 21st-century skills. With computers in use across the majority of U.S. schools now, many educators may feel the need to focus on educational software. But while the debate rages over how to best implement technology into the classroom, we should also be mindful of the need to develop the fundamental skills required to interact fully with the machines themselves.

Learn How to Teach Computer Science With MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION [Infographic]

Looking for innovative ways to bring computational thinking and computer science skills to your STEM classes? MINECRAFT: EDUCATION EDITION might be just the teaching tool for you, whether you’re an experienced player or are just learning about Minecraft.Below are all the resources you’ll need to kickstart a game-based learning adventure in your classroom—no advanced degree in gaming required.

I Moved a Drone With My Mind. Soon Your Students Will Too.

I recently moved a drone with my mind. Not long ago my 6-year-old son spent two hours on my bed swishing through the world’s biggest roller coasters on YouTube with cardboard virtual reality glasses. My mind-control-drone-moving experience was nothing like this.

How to Prepare Students for Jobs in the Self-Driving-Car-Industry

Many roads lead to a career in the self-driving car industry. That painfully obvious pun is actually one of the truest things you can say about this nascent, multidisciplinary enterprise, and it also encapsulates the challenge educators who want to prepare their students to work in this industry are facing today.

Leveling Up Language Learners’ 21st-Century Skills with Minecraft

“Can we set the story in Minecraft?”We had been working for several weeks on a storytelling unit in my ESL classes in 2012. We had read and analysed short stories, examined the grammar of narrative tenses, looked into setting, character descriptions and developing plots. It was time to create our own stories.Yet, one group was struggling for ideas. I needed to intervene. I suggested taking inspiration from a story they knew. What films had they watched recently? Were there any popular TV shows to use as a starting point?“Or video games,” one student suggested.

How This Business Simulation Prepared My Students for 21st-Century Careers

High-schooler Caitlyn sits in front of a computer on the campus of Rider University, frantically scanning various pop-ups on her screen. Business reports, market trends and price fluctuations race through her mind, as she seeks the one piece of information she needs. Her team is spending the day figuring out how to effectively sell bottled water in three German provinces— all while competing against six other groups doing the same.

Playing Games Can Build 21st-Century Skills. Research Explains How.

As anyone who’s ever spent hours hunched over Candy Crush can attest, there’s something special about games. Sure they’re fun, but they can also be absorbing, frustrating, challenging and complex.

School Needs a Redesign, and Educators Can Lead the Way

Imagine yourself back in a classroom. You’re not taking English or history or pre-calculus; the sign on the door says “Obstacles.” You enter and on the board is your first assignment: create something—a drawing, a model of a house, a sketch of a new product, a sculpture. You do, and then as you step back, the teacher steps forward and smashes your creation. And tells you your next assignment is to pick up the pieces (including yourself) and make something new.

This District Rolled Out Minecraft and Teacher Collaboration Skyrocketed

When Roanoke County Public Schools gathered educators for their first training in how to teach with Minecraft: Education Edition (M:EE), “you could hear the rumble in the room,” says Jeff Terry, the district’s director of technology. That was early 2018. Today, his district is among the top ten for M:EE usage worldwide.

Computer Science Now More Than an Elective for University of California Admissions

At campuses that teach the subject, computer science is often offered as an elective at high schools in California. But now, for prospective University of California students, that course can count as a science requirement on college applications, too.

Syndicate content