Enterprises

20 By 2020: Quizlet’s Big Revenue Ambitions From Third-Party Content Partners

For its first 10 years, Quizlet was humming along just fine. The bootstrapped, San Francisco-based company claimed it was profitable thanks to its free popular digital flashcards, for which users could pay an annual subscription to get additional features. Then—and now—it ranked among the top 25 most popular U.S. websites, according to Quantcast.

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Google, Facebook, Amazon Among Tech Titans Committing $300 Million to K-12 Computer Science

A gaggle of technology companies joined Ivanka Trump in Detroit this morning to commit more than $300 million to K-12 computer science education programs.According to the Internet Association, a lobbying group for the industry, the following companies will donate the following amounts during the next five years:

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Microcredentials and Macro-dollars: How an Online Ad Led 2U's Chip Paucek to Make a $120M Bet

Chip Paucek is an entrepreneur’s entrepreneur. After two other startups sputtered, Paucek cofounded and runs 2U, which made its debut on the public market in March 2014. It closed that first day at $13.90 and has since grown to more than $50 a share. He lives the product, too: Paucek earned his own MBA by taking classes through 2U’s program with North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School.

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?Another Major Coding Bootcamp, Iron Yard, Announces Closure

The Iron Yard, a Greenville, S.C.-based coding bootcamp, is closing up shop. The school wrote in a blog post today that it will be ceasing operations at all of its 15 campuses around the U.S. after its current 12-week session finishes.“In considering the current environment, the board of The Iron Yard has made the difficult decision to cease operations at all campuses after teaching out remaining summer cohorts. We will finish out summer classes completely, including career support,” the announcement reads.

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Amazon Inspire Goes Live (But Without Controversial Share Feature)

After more than a year of invitation-only private beta, Amazon just opened its free library of open-education resources, called Amazon Inspire.
Well, it’s more accurate to say the site is partially open. Amazon Inspire is still missing its most controversial feature—the ability for any teacher to share lesson plans, worksheets, and other materials with colleagues.

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?Dev Bootcamp Community Reacts to Closure Decision

John-Michael Murphy had just finished up a long day of assessments on Wednesday evening when he received an email with some unexpected news. His school, Dev Bootcamp, wrote that it would be shutting down about three months after his graduation this summer.

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Unable to ‘Reach a Sustainable Business Model,’ Dev Bootcamp Will Shut Down in December

Dev Bootcamp, a pioneer in the coding school industry that was among the first to offer short-term, intensive programs to help learners acquire web development and programming skills, announced it will be shutting its doors on December 8.
In an email, the company stated that “we’ve determined that we simply cannot reach a sustainable business model without compromising our mission of delivering a high-quality coding education that remains accessible to a diverse population of students.”

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What Happened to Amazon Inspire, the Tech Giant’s Education Marketplace?

Last summer the world’s largest online retailer launched Amazon Inspire, touting it as a hub for educators to exchange lesson plans and other Open Education Resources. But a year later, the site remains in limited, invitation-only beta. Some wonder when it will be open to the wider education community (and what the company’s broader education strategy is).

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On the Hotseat: 7 Questions for Remind’s New CEO, Brian Grey

Former Bleacher Report CEO Brian Grey is no stranger when it comes to game plans. But lesson plans? That’s a new field he’s now tackling as CEO of Remind, a San Francisco-based education company whose mission is to improve education by better connecting teachers, students and parents.

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Students As Customers? Salesforce Tailors CRM Tools for Schools

What does customer relationship management have to do with improving learning outcomes?
Salesforce, the San Francisco software juggernaut renowned for its CRM tools and lavish parties, is betting schools can achieve greater student success with its customer relationship management system.
The publicly traded company believes the same CRM systems that businesses use to track customer data and interactions can also help schools recruit, develop relationships with students and improve graduation rates.

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