Practice and Implementation Strategies

Your Device Rollout Isn’t About Hardware—It’s About Engagement

For anyone involved in education, the importance of engagement is clear. And the need for both student engagement and buy-in cannot be overstated when it comes to device rollout.

Spaced Practice Works. A Learning Scientist Helped Me Understand Why.

I passed the fraction test back to my pre-algebra class and an awkward silence filled the room. The 20 students in my class received a wide range of grades, causing a mixture of satisfaction and dismay. A quarter of them had mastered the skills and were ready to apply what they had learned about fractions to solving linear equations. About half showed competency with the skills, but were still making numerous errors. The rest were lost and stuffed the tests into their binders immediately after glancing at their grade.

This Teacher Started a Hands-On PD Lab That’s Sparking Change Across the District

In 2013, I was hired to teach computer science (CS) and video game design to students in grades K-5 at Monte Sano Elementary School in Huntsville, Ala. It was my first full-time teaching job. A year earlier, I had graduated with a teaching degree in elementary education. Though I was technology savvy, none of my classwork or student teaching prepared me for this. I wasn’t trained to teach computer science, how was I supposed to make this work?

Counselors Couldn’t Keep Up With Our Growing Mental Health Crisis, So Peers Stepped Up

It’s 7:30 a.m. on a Monday morning. I welcome students into the building with an optimistic smile on my face while teachers give an endless supply of high fives, and students yawn and find a corner to sit with their friends. The bell rings and I head to make my coffee, eager to hunker down and prioritize my tasks for the week. Before I make it to the coffee pot, I hear my name over the walkie talkie and off I go—without caffeine. A student needs me, and so it begins. By the time I return, two students are waiting outside my office and I’ve got two notes on my door.

Growth over Grades: How a Resubmit Policy Is Helping Us Build a Culture of Revision

This is the second part of a two-part story about changing classroom culture. Read part one to learn how this teacher improved her student feedback system to increase student engagement."Are you going to resubmit your chemical changes model?" Valentina asked Jayda.

How Improving Student Feedback and Teaching Data Science Restored Our Classroom Culture

Over winter break in 2015, I found myself scouring the internet for career alternatives that would take me out of the classroom. I was in my fifth year of teaching at Forest Ridge, an independent all-girls school serving students in grades 5-12 in Bellevue, Wash., and I was feeling isolated in a room with students who didn’t seem to want to engage with my class, despite all my efforts to bring enthusiasm and passion to my work.

Why Elementary Schools Should Teach Kids to Play Poker

Maria Konnikova doesn’t buy the "10,000 hour rule"—that theory popularized by Malcolm Gladwell that it takes at least 10,000 hours of serious practice to become a world-class expert at an activity. She believes she’s found a way to short-circuit it, and it involves marshmallows and poker.

Move Over, Laptop Ban. This Professor Teaches a 5-Hour Tech-Less Reading Class.

David Peña-Guzmán starts off his Friday class at San Francisco State University like any other professor might: students file in and pull out their note-taking materials, and he opens his laptop to begin lecture.

How a Prescription Pill Emergency Woke up Our School Community to a Mental Health Crisis

When four ambulances arrived at school in 2015 to transport middle school students who had taken prescription drugs in the classroom, it was a career first for me. We had made so much progress as a school community to improve student behavior in the classroom that year, having reduced disciplinary referrals by 25 percent. However, as the sirens blared that morning, I realized classroom behavior was just the tip of the iceberg. If we really wanted to improve student behavior, we needed to take a deeper look at what was happening in their lives.

Using Neuroscience to Launch a Research-Informed School Schedule

It is 8 p.m. and Sam is sitting down for the first time in hours after a long day at school, which was followed by play practice; she is Liesel in the upcoming performance of “The Sound of Music.” After leaving school at 5 p.m., she had a two-hour soccer practice, a brief dinner with her family and a shower.

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