websites

Blog, Wiki, or Website - Key Points to Consider

One of the questions that I am asked on a fairly frequent basis is, "should I create a blog, a wiki, or a website for my classroom?" Each platform serv

Find Your Role Model

Recently, a friend of mine posted this link on Facebook, and I was excited to share with you the possibilities it holds for the classroom. The Academy of Acheivement (A Museum of Living History) has developed a page titled, “Find Your Role Model“ on their website. This is essentially a search engine that students can use to find suitable mentors based on three main categories, as shown in the screenshot below:

BardBytes: Shakespeare on the Web

I wanted to share with you a work-in-progress, but exciting website: BardBytes. BardBytes, aptly summarized by its title, is an effort to bridge the gap between the Elizabethan Era and the 21st century classroom by providing educators with modern Shakespearean resources. Resources are categorized into history, tragedy, comedy and poetry, and then by individual plays.

CalmCounter: Free Classroom Noise Level Monitor!

The Bouncy Balls classroom noise level monitor remains to this day one of the most popular posts on TeachBytes. So, when I came across CalmCounter, I knew I had to share immediately. Although it doesn’t have any exciting bouncing balls, it is still a solid way to measure classroom noise:

Free Rice: Answer Questions Correctly and Help Alleviate World Hunger

Sounds a little farfetched, I know, but it is true! At Free Rice, every question you answer correctly donates 10 grains of rice to the United Nations World Food Program. This website is a wonderful way for students to practice important subject skills and simultaneously learn about charity and world hunger.

Daily Writing Prompts: Foster Creativity With Writing

A while ago, when I was searching the web for creative ideas for writing prompts, I came Writing Prompts. This is Tumblr weblog run by educator Luke Neff, who posts a new, visually appealing writing prompt each day (or almost each day). These are fantastic and creative, and often encourage higher level thinking from students.

10 Places to Find Documentaries Online

The documentary selection in our library is decent, but I often find myself looking online for educational videos and feature-films to show my students. Unfortunately, most online documentaries require you to download the full film and have some sort of torrenting software.

8 Online Resources for Women’s History Month

I recently learned that March is National Women’s History Month.  I encourage all of you to take this month as an opportunity to educate your students on the struggles and successes of women throughout history.

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